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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://acervodigital.unesp.br/handle/unesp/369616
Title: 
Stereotopicity and Baeyer Strain theory [Freshman organic chemistry]
Author(s): 
McBride, J. Michael
Language: 
eng
Description: 
  • Educação Superior::Ciências Exatas e da Terra::Química
  • Presents part of course, Freshman organic chemistry, when Professor McBride discusses the question "why ethane has a rotational barrier is still debatable. Shows the analyzing conformational and configurational stereotopicity relationships among constitutionally equivalent groups reveals a subtle discrimination in enzyme reactions. When Baeyer suggested strain-induced reactivity due to distorting bond angles away from those in an ideal tetrahedron, he assumed that the cyclohexane ring is flat. Professor explains wich He was soon corrected by clever Sachse, but Sachse's weakness in rhetoric led to a quarter-century of confusion
Issue Date: 
  • 31-Mar-2010
  • 21-Nov-2008
  • 12-Mar-2013
  • 12-Mar-2013
  • 12-Mar-2013
Publisher: 
Yale University, Open Yale Courses
Keywords: 
  • Educação Superior::Ciências Exatas e da Terra::Química::Química Orgânica
  • Stereotopicity relationship
  • Reaction
  • Enzyme
  • Chemistry
Notes: 
To explain about ethane rotational barrier, cyclohexane ring and enzyme reactions
Credits: 
Duration: 46 min, 4 s. To hear this resource its necessary the instalation of Quick time. Available at: <http://www.apple.com/pt/quicktime/>
Source: 
http://objetoseducacionais2.mec.gov.br/handle/mec/22536
URI: 
http://acervodigital.unesp.br/handle/unesp/369616
Rights: 
Yale University 2009. Some rights reserved. Unless otherwise indicated in the applicable Credits section of certain lecture pages, all content on this web site is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Please refer to the Credits section to determine whether third-party restrictions on the use of content apply
Type: 
áudio
Appears in Collections:MEC - Objetos Educacionais (BIOE) - OE

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